Are There Viable Alternatives to the DSM-5?

Check out my latest Psychology Today blog post. Here’s an excerpt:

Despite oft-heard complaints about it, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) continues to be the primary diagnostic manual used by mental health professionals. However, in the last few years there has been a lot of discussion about potential alternatives to the DSM-5. Below is a primer providing links to basic information about several alternatives for those interested in learning about them. Can any of these alternatives win something roughly akin to a diagnostic game of thrones? Let’s review some of the main competitors.

Game of Thrones action figure

Textbooks for Summer 2019 Classes

For Summer 2019, I will be teaching two undergraduate classes:

  • PSY273 Psychology of Adjustment
  • PSY440 Clinical and Counseling Psychology

Here are the required books for these classes. They can be purchased from a variety of sellers, including Amazon and the Campus Bookstore.

  • PSY273 Psychology of Adjustment:
    Moritsugu, J., Vera, E, M., Harmon Jacobs, J., & Kennedy, M. (2017). Psychology of adjustment: The search for meaningful balance. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Article on Alternatives to the DSM Suitable for Psychotherapists

New article in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology:

Raskin, J. D. (2019). What might an alternative to the DSM suitable for psychotherapists look like? Journal of Humanistic Psychology59(3), 368-375. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022167818761919

The article is part of a special issue, “Diagnostic Alternatives Part 4.”

Abstract:

Recent research suggests that psychologists and counselors are dissatisfied with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, and open to seeing the development of alternatives to it. Any alternative suitable for psychotherapists must meet certain requirements. A successful alternative must (a) place psychosocial factors on equal footing with biological factors; (b) categorize problems, not people; (c) be scientifically grounded; (d) be collaboratively developed; and (e) be usable across orientations, professions, and constituencies.

Journal of Humanistic Psychology cover

Podcast: Constructing Alternatives to the DSM

Photo of phrenology bustsOn MIA Radio, MIA’s Jessica Janze interviewed Dr. Jonathan Raskin, in the Department of Psychology at the State University of New York at New Paltz, where he serves as department chair and teaches classes in psychology and counselor education. He recently authored a textbook titled Abnormal Psychology: Contrasting Perspectives.

Dr. Raskin describes a recent article he wrote (What Might an Alternative to the DSM Suitable for Psychotherapists Look Like?) that highlights psychotherapists’ dissatisfaction with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) and suggests some principles for building alternative models.

Listen to the podcast and read the transcript on the MIA site.

Or listen to the podcast by clicking play below: