Online First Publication: The Practice of Context-Centered Psychotherapy

A new article in which I interview Jay Efran about how he structures his psychotherapy practice is now available as an online first publication:

Raskin, J. D., & Efran. J. S. (2019). The practice of context-centered psychotherapy: A conversation with Jay Efran. The Humanistic Psychologist. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hum0000143

Abstract:

This article presents an interview with Jay S. Efran, the developer of context-centered psychotherapy—an approach to psychotherapy greatly influenced by Humberto Maturana’s structure determinism and George Kelly’s personal construct theory. Because Efran has outlined the premises of context-centered therapy elsewhere, the interview focused on the nuts and bolts of Efran’s independent practice, with the goal of illustrating how the way he works reflects his theoretical commitments. Efran was asked how he contracts with clients, structures first sessions, conducts the therapy that follows, and brings therapy to a conclusion. In addition to discussing what he sees as the predictors of therapeutic success, he was also asked about the size of his caseload, the duration of his sessions, the number of times he typically meets with clients, whether he takes notes during sessions, his thoughts on the role of medication in therapy, and how he handles insurance and billing. The interview concludes with a case study and advice to psychotherapists-in-training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)

Cover, The Humanistic Psychologist

 

Article on Alternatives to the DSM Suitable for Psychotherapists

New article in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology:

Raskin, J. D. (2019). What might an alternative to the DSM suitable for psychotherapists look like? Journal of Humanistic Psychology59(3), 368-375. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022167818761919

The article is part of a special issue, “Diagnostic Alternatives Part 4.”

Abstract:

Recent research suggests that psychologists and counselors are dissatisfied with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, and open to seeing the development of alternatives to it. Any alternative suitable for psychotherapists must meet certain requirements. A successful alternative must (a) place psychosocial factors on equal footing with biological factors; (b) categorize problems, not people; (c) be scientifically grounded; (d) be collaboratively developed; and (e) be usable across orientations, professions, and constituencies.

Journal of Humanistic Psychology cover

Special Issue on Ethics Available as Advance Online Publications

JCP cover

I have two articles in a special issue on ethics slated to appear in the Journal of Constructivist Psychology. The articles are currently available as advance online publications. Details and links below.



Special Issue: Constructivism and Ethical Meaning-Making: A Target Article and Responses

 

Studies in Meaning 5 Published

I am pleased to announce that the latest volume of Studies in Meaning has been published by Pace University Press:

Studies in Meaning 5: Disturbing the Status Quo in Constructivist Psychology (20% pre-publication discount!)
Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, & Jack S. Kahn

SiM5-cover-draftIs constructivist psychology still relevant? Was it ever? Is it merely an obtuse cluster of theories bogged down in obscure epistemological debates of little to no relevance for most people? Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field? This volume takes up these issues by having prominent constructivist theorists put aside the usual topics of their scholarship and instead directly grapple with the very questions posed above. Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to “perturb” the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism’s past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.

ISBN-13: 978-1935625186 / ISBN-10: 1935625187 / ©2015 / $40.00 / Pace University Press
Also available directly from Amazon or from the Amazon-powered CPN Bookstore.

Other Studies in Meaning volumes

Pre-publication Discount on Studies in Meaning 5

SiM5-cover-draftSTUDIES IN MEANING 5: PERTURBING THE STATUS QUO IN CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOLOGY

AVAILABLE NOW AT THE PRE-PUBLICATION (20% DISCOUNT) PRICE OF $32.00 US!

Printable pre-publication order form

Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, and Jack S. Kahn

 

DESCRIPTION:

Is constructivist psychology still relevant? Was it ever? Is it merely an obtuse cluster of theories bogged down in obscure epistemological debates of little to no relevance for most people? Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field? This volume takes up these issues by having prominent constructivist theorists put aside the usual topics of their scholarship and instead directly grapple with the very questions posed above. Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to “perturb” the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism’s past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.

CONTENTS:

PART I: CONSTRUCTIVISM

1. An Introductory Perturbation: What Is Constructivism and Is There a Future in It? – Jonathan D. Raskin

2. What Does the Future Hold for Personal Construct Psychology? – David A. Winter

3. What Does the Future Hold for Radical Constructivism? – Alexander Riegler

PART II: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIONISM AND NARRATIVE PSYCHOLOGY

4. On Being a Social Constructionist in a More Than Human World – Tom Strong

5. Paradoxes of the Constructed: Narrative Psychology and Beyond – Mark Freeman

PART III: CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOTHERAPY

6. Where’s the Gimmick? Future Prospects for Constructivist Psychotherapy – Jay S. Efran and Jonah N. Cohen

7. Developing a Dialogue: Constructivist Convergence in Psychotherapy and Beyond – Robert A. Neimeyer, Donald Meichenbaum, and Caroline M. Stanley

PART IV: LOOKING FORWARD

8. Imagining Possible Futures: Scenarios for Constructivist Psychology – Jelena Pavlović

9. What Would an Integrative Constructivism Look Like? – Michael F. Mascolo, Michael Basseches, and Amanda El-Hashem

10. Constructivism: Where Do We Go from Here? – Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, and Jack S. Kahn

Retail price $40

Order by March 15, 2015 to take advantage of this 20% off offer of $32 US.

Printable pre-publication order form

For complete information on this and other Pace University Press titles, visit www.pace.edu/press.

For information on the Studies in Meaning books series, including how to purchase earlier volumes, visit http://www.constructivistpsych.org/sim.

Also see http://www.constructivistpsych.org/archives/4681.

Reverse Golden Section Article Published

New article published:

Raskin, J. D., & Brett, B. L. (2014). Does the reverse golden section hold? Journal of Constructivist Psychology27(2), 137-146. doi: 10.1080/10720537.2014.879522

Abstract:

Recent research has found support for a reverse golden section hypothesis, whereby people rate stigmatized identities negatively 61.8% of the time and positively 38.2% of the time. Two golden section studies were undertaken. The first replicated a previous study in which a reverse golden section pattern was found for people rating homeless and mental patient identities. The second investigated whether the reverse golden section pattern held when mental health practitioners and trainees rated these same identities. The first study confirmed use of a reverse golden section pattern by nonprofessionals in rating homeless and mental patient identities, whereas the second study found that mental health practitioners and trainees did not use such a pattern.