Are There Viable Alternatives to the DSM-5?

Check out my latest Psychology Today blog post. Here’s an excerpt:

Despite oft-heard complaints about it, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) continues to be the primary diagnostic manual used by mental health professionals. However, in the last few years there has been a lot of discussion about potential alternatives to the DSM-5. Below is a primer providing links to basic information about several alternatives for those interested in learning about them. Can any of these alternatives win something roughly akin to a diagnostic game of thrones? Let’s review some of the main competitors.

Game of Thrones action figure

Can Therapists Really Share Power with Clients?

New post on my blog, “Making Meaning: Constructing Understandings in a Confusing World.”

Excerpt:

Share the Road

Source: By cogdogblog / flickr [via Wikimedia Commons]

When a therapist gives power away, what does this mean? Does the client get to decide how long sessions last? Where they are held? What diagnostic code goes to the insurance company? What theoretical orientation the clinician utilizes? What the therapist’s fee is? Some of these items might be up for discussion with clients, but my guess is that many others are typically nonnegotiable. If so, then isn’t at least some therapist power inevitably retained?