Book Chapter on Integrative Constructivism

1118508319Forthcoming chapter on integrative constructivism in The Wiley handbook of personal construct psychology:

Excerpt:

Personal construct psychologists have historically had an uneasy relationship with constructivism. Some have objected to it on philosophical grounds, arguing that George Kelly’s (1955, 1991a, 1991b) personalconstruct psychology (PCP) is best viewed as a critical realist, not constructivist, approach (Noaparast, 1995; Stevens, 1998; Warren, 1998). Others have worried that constructivism has the potential to overshadow PCP, placing the latter in a precarious position (Fransella, 1995, 2007). Others still have argued that constructivism is broad and ill-defined—or, at the very least, is less theoretically and methodologically developed than PCP (Fransella, 1995; Winter, 2014). These concerns arise in part because constructivism and its precise relationship to PCP typically go unspecified. To remedy this, I present four premises of an integrative constructivism and address how PCP—in conjunction with other forms of constructivism—both fits within it and contributes to it. My goal is to offer a meta-framework that lets PCP maintain its own integrity as a theoretical unity, while also offering a set of shared premises that permit PCP’s inclusion under a superordinate integrative constructivist banner.

Full reference:

Raskin, J. D. (2016). Personal construct psychology in relation to an integrative constructivism. In D. A. Winter & N. Reed (Eds.), The Wiley handbook of personal construct psychology (pp. 34-44). London, England: Wiley-Blackwell.

Psychologist Attitudes about DSM-5 Paper Available as Advance Online Publication

home_coverMy coauthored article with Mike Gayle on psychologist attitudes toward the DSM-5 is now available as an advance online publication. Check it out.

Reference

Raskin, J. D., & Gayle, M. C. (2015). DSM-5: Do psychologists really want an alternative? Journal of Humanistic Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/0022167815577897

Abstract

Only two published studies, both from the early 1980s, have specifically examined psychologist attitudes toward the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The current article rectifies this by presenting the results of a recent survey of attitudes toward the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5. Though the DSM has changed over the years, psychologist attitudes toward it have remained remarkably consistent. Although more than 90% of psychologists report using the DSM, they are dissatisfied with numerous aspects of it and support developing alternatives to it—something that psychologists over 30 years ago supported, as well. The finding that almost all psychologists use the DSM despite serious concerns about it raises ethical issues because professionals are ethically bound to only use instruments in which they are scientifically confident.

Studies in Meaning 5 Published

I am pleased to announce that the latest volume of Studies in Meaning has been published by Pace University Press:

Studies in Meaning 5: Disturbing the Status Quo in Constructivist Psychology (20% pre-publication discount!)
Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, & Jack S. Kahn

SiM5-cover-draftIs constructivist psychology still relevant? Was it ever? Is it merely an obtuse cluster of theories bogged down in obscure epistemological debates of little to no relevance for most people? Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field? This volume takes up these issues by having prominent constructivist theorists put aside the usual topics of their scholarship and instead directly grapple with the very questions posed above. Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to “perturb” the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism’s past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.

ISBN-13: 978-1935625186 / ISBN-10: 1935625187 / ©2015 / $40.00 / Pace University Press
Also available directly from Amazon or from the Amazon-powered CPN Bookstore.

Other Studies in Meaning volumes

Pre-publication Discount on Studies in Meaning 5

SiM5-cover-draftSTUDIES IN MEANING 5: PERTURBING THE STATUS QUO IN CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOLOGY

AVAILABLE NOW AT THE PRE-PUBLICATION (20% DISCOUNT) PRICE OF $32.00 US!

Printable pre-publication order form

Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, and Jack S. Kahn

 

DESCRIPTION:

Is constructivist psychology still relevant? Was it ever? Is it merely an obtuse cluster of theories bogged down in obscure epistemological debates of little to no relevance for most people? Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field? This volume takes up these issues by having prominent constructivist theorists put aside the usual topics of their scholarship and instead directly grapple with the very questions posed above. Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to “perturb” the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism’s past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.

CONTENTS:

PART I: CONSTRUCTIVISM

1. An Introductory Perturbation: What Is Constructivism and Is There a Future in It? – Jonathan D. Raskin

2. What Does the Future Hold for Personal Construct Psychology? – David A. Winter

3. What Does the Future Hold for Radical Constructivism? – Alexander Riegler

PART II: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIONISM AND NARRATIVE PSYCHOLOGY

4. On Being a Social Constructionist in a More Than Human World – Tom Strong

5. Paradoxes of the Constructed: Narrative Psychology and Beyond – Mark Freeman

PART III: CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOTHERAPY

6. Where’s the Gimmick? Future Prospects for Constructivist Psychotherapy – Jay S. Efran and Jonah N. Cohen

7. Developing a Dialogue: Constructivist Convergence in Psychotherapy and Beyond – Robert A. Neimeyer, Donald Meichenbaum, and Caroline M. Stanley

PART IV: LOOKING FORWARD

8. Imagining Possible Futures: Scenarios for Constructivist Psychology – Jelena Pavlović

9. What Would an Integrative Constructivism Look Like? – Michael F. Mascolo, Michael Basseches, and Amanda El-Hashem

10. Constructivism: Where Do We Go from Here? – Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, and Jack S. Kahn

Retail price $40

Order by March 15, 2015 to take advantage of this 20% off offer of $32 US.

Printable pre-publication order form

For complete information on this and other Pace University Press titles, visit www.pace.edu/press.

For information on the Studies in Meaning books series, including how to purchase earlier volumes, visit http://www.constructivistpsych.org/sim.

Also see http://www.constructivistpsych.org/archives/4681.

New Blog Post: How About a Diagnostic Alternative for Use in Talk Therapy?

New blog post:

Raskin, J. D. (2014, August 18). How about a diagnostic alternative for use in talk therapy? [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://dxsummit.org/archives/2190

Excerpt:

ID-100178853In order to devise a diagnostic alternative with widespread appeal, we must:

a) generate a system that is not bound to any particular theoretical orientation other than one that sees all forms of counseling and psychotherapy as means of using conversation and relational engagement to help clients address their presenting concerns;

b) build a system that involves all relevant constituencies and professions in the process of its creation; this means not just involving representatives of the various helping professions, but also guaranteeing a seat at the table for consumers of services and insurers who cover services;

c) include a practical way for clinicians to code concerns that people bring to the consulting room and provide evidence that we can effectively help people with these concerns, so that insurers see what is being offered as empirically-supported and in their financial interest to cover.

Review of “Philosophy’s Role in Counseling and Psychotherapy” in PsycCRITIQUES

I recently published a book review of Peter B. Raabe’s Philosophy’s Role in Counseling and Psychotherapy in PsycCRITIQUES. Here is the full reference:

Raskin, J. D. (in press). Philosophically tilting at psychotherapy’s windmills [Review of the book Philosophy’s role in counseling and psychotherapy, by P. B. Raabe]. PsycCRITIQUES59(30). doi:10.1037/a0036955

Raabe-cover