Studies in Meaning 5 Published

I am pleased to announce that the latest volume of Studies in Meaning has been published by Pace University Press:

Studies in Meaning 5: Disturbing the Status Quo in Constructivist Psychology (20% pre-publication discount!)
Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, & Jack S. Kahn

SiM5-cover-draftIs constructivist psychology still relevant? Was it ever? Is it merely an obtuse cluster of theories bogged down in obscure epistemological debates of little to no relevance for most people? Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field? This volume takes up these issues by having prominent constructivist theorists put aside the usual topics of their scholarship and instead directly grapple with the very questions posed above. Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to “perturb” the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism’s past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.

ISBN-13: 978-1935625186 / ISBN-10: 1935625187 / ©2015 / $40.00 / Pace University Press
Also available directly from Amazon or from the Amazon-powered CPN Bookstore.

Other Studies in Meaning volumes

Pre-publication Discount on Studies in Meaning 5

SiM5-cover-draftSTUDIES IN MEANING 5: PERTURBING THE STATUS QUO IN CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOLOGY

AVAILABLE NOW AT THE PRE-PUBLICATION (20% DISCOUNT) PRICE OF $32.00 US!

Printable pre-publication order form

Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, and Jack S. Kahn

 

DESCRIPTION:

Is constructivist psychology still relevant? Was it ever? Is it merely an obtuse cluster of theories bogged down in obscure epistemological debates of little to no relevance for most people? Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field? This volume takes up these issues by having prominent constructivist theorists put aside the usual topics of their scholarship and instead directly grapple with the very questions posed above. Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to “perturb” the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism’s past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.

CONTENTS:

PART I: CONSTRUCTIVISM

1. An Introductory Perturbation: What Is Constructivism and Is There a Future in It? – Jonathan D. Raskin

2. What Does the Future Hold for Personal Construct Psychology? – David A. Winter

3. What Does the Future Hold for Radical Constructivism? – Alexander Riegler

PART II: SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIONISM AND NARRATIVE PSYCHOLOGY

4. On Being a Social Constructionist in a More Than Human World – Tom Strong

5. Paradoxes of the Constructed: Narrative Psychology and Beyond – Mark Freeman

PART III: CONSTRUCTIVIST PSYCHOTHERAPY

6. Where’s the Gimmick? Future Prospects for Constructivist Psychotherapy – Jay S. Efran and Jonah N. Cohen

7. Developing a Dialogue: Constructivist Convergence in Psychotherapy and Beyond – Robert A. Neimeyer, Donald Meichenbaum, and Caroline M. Stanley

PART IV: LOOKING FORWARD

8. Imagining Possible Futures: Scenarios for Constructivist Psychology – Jelena Pavlović

9. What Would an Integrative Constructivism Look Like? – Michael F. Mascolo, Michael Basseches, and Amanda El-Hashem

10. Constructivism: Where Do We Go from Here? – Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, and Jack S. Kahn

Retail price $40

Order by March 15, 2015 to take advantage of this 20% off offer of $32 US.

Printable pre-publication order form

For complete information on this and other Pace University Press titles, visit www.pace.edu/press.

For information on the Studies in Meaning books series, including how to purchase earlier volumes, visit http://www.constructivistpsych.org/sim.

Also see http://www.constructivistpsych.org/archives/4681.

Updated “Constructivism in Psychology” Article

An updated version of my 2002 online article, “Constructivism in psychology: Personal construct psychology, radical constructivism, and social constructionism,” is now available at this web address:

https://hawksites.newpaltz.edu/raskinj/files/2011/05/Raskin-2002-ACJ-reprint-updated-appendix.pdf.

This version includes some copy editing corrections (most importantly, Ernst von Glasersfeld’s last name is now spelled correctly in this version) and an updated list of web links (the links in the original article are nearly 10 years old and many are no longer active or have changed; new links of sites added since 2002 have also been added).

The original version remains available on the American Communication Journal site.

Full reference:

Raskin, J. D. (2002). Constructivism in psychology: Personal construct psychology, radical constructivism, and social constructionismAmerican Communication Journal5(3). Retrieved from http://www.ac-journal.org (Simultaneously published in Studies in meaning: Exploring Constructivist Psychology, pp. 1-25, by J. D. Raskin & S. K. Bridges, Eds., 2002, New York: Pace University Press) Available online in HTML Available in PDF format [HTML link is original version; pdf link is updated version]

My Social Justice Chapter in Studies in Meaning 4

I have a chapter examining social justice from a constructivist perspective in my 2010 co-edited volume, Studies in Meaning 4: Constructivist Perspective on Theory, Practice, and Social Justice. The chapter is intended to offer a constructive critique of the ways social justice is often invoked in the counseling professions. Here is an excerpt that provides an overview of the chapter:

Studies in Meaning 4The idea of social justice, generally speaking, is something everybody finds appealing and agreeable. Further, criticizing social justice perspectives runs the risk of getting one accused of favoring injustice. For these reasons, few have critically scrutinized the philosophical and practical issues arising from the move toward a social justice orientation in counseling and related professions. This chapter employs ideas from constructivism and social constructionism in examining social justice in psychology and counseling. After establishing social justice counseling as a distinct theoretical orientation, a constructivist critique of this orientation is developed. Social justice counseling is criticized as: (1) espousing naïve realism; (2) being theoretically unelaborated; (3) imposing values; (4) being hubristic; and (5) going beyond psychology and counseling’s range of convenience. Social justice counselors are urged to articulate a detailed theoretical approach that restricts its focus of convenience to counseling and demonstrates its utility compared to existing counseling approaches. (Raskin, 2010, p. 248-249)

Reference

Raskin, J. D. (2010). Constructing and deconstructing social justice counseling. In J. D. Raskin, S. K. Bridges, & R. A. Neimeyer (Eds.), Studies in meaning 4: Constructivist perspectives on theory, practice, and social justice (pp. 247-276). New York: Pace University Press.

Studies in Meaning 4 Published

I am pleased to announce that the latest volume of Studies in Meaning has been published by Pace University Press:

Studies in Meaning 4Studies in Meaning 4: Constructivist Perspectives on Theory, Practice, and Social Justice

Edited by Jonathan D. Raskin, Sara K. Bridges, & Robert A. Neimeyer

This volume addresses cutting edge issues in constructivist psychology dealing with theory, practice, and social justice. The volume begins by delving into thorny issues of meaning and communication from both radical constructivist and social constructionist perspectives. Building on this, prominent practitioners share advances in research and practice related to constructivist therapy – including work exploring grief, love, and narrative. From there, the volume pays special attention to constructivist conceptions of social justice as they relate to working with torture survivors, mentoring graduate students, and dealing with the objectification of women; it even uses constructivist theory to reflexively examine the limits of social justice counseling as a theoretical orientation. Finally, the volume comes full circle by revisiting theory – this time exploring the value preferences that often infuse research on epistemological beliefs, the metaphor of the psychotherapist-as-philosopher-of-science, and the contentious status of individualism within pragmatism and constructivism. In sum, Studies in Meaning 4 highlights constructivism’s multiplicity through fourteen stimulating and, at times, controversial scholarly contributions intended to sharpen the implications of constructivism for social critique and psychological practice.

ISBN 0-944473-98-9 / ©2010 / $40.00 / Pace University Press
Also available directly from Amazon or from the Amazon-powered CPN Bookstore.

Other Studies in Meaning volumes