Can Therapists Really Share Power with Clients?

New post on my blog, “Making Meaning: Constructing Understandings in a Confusing World.”

Excerpt:

Share the Road

Source: By cogdogblog / flickr [via Wikimedia Commons]

When a therapist gives power away, what does this mean? Does the client get to decide how long sessions last? Where they are held? What diagnostic code goes to the insurance company? What theoretical orientation the clinician utilizes? What the therapist’s fee is? Some of these items might be up for discussion with clients, but my guess is that many others are typically nonnegotiable. If so, then isn’t at least some therapist power inevitably retained?

Counselor Attitudes about DSM-5 Paper Available as Advance Online Publication

My coauthored article with Mike Gayle on counselor attitudes toward the DSM-5 is now available as an advance online publication. Check it out.

Reference

Gayle, M. C., & Raskin, J. D. (2017). DSM-5: Do counselors really want an alternative? Journal of Humanistic Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/0022167817696839

Abstract

The results of a survey exploring counselor attitudes toward the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. The survey revealed that counselors have mixed attitudes toward the DSM. They view DSM positively and see it as both beneficial to their profession and important in determining treatment. They also believe that DSM-5 revisions reflect the best science available. Counselors worry that the DSM prioritizes diagnosis over treatment, have concerns about proposed DSM-5 revisions, and support developing alternatives to the DSM.